Field Telescope – the real deal

You may have read a post I wrote ages ago about an inexpensive Indian-made “training” telescope? Well, here’s the real deal. A while back I was lucky enough to acquire a very nice 1917-vintage old-timey brass military telescope to use alongside my 1900-ish deer stalker’s telescope, and of course the half-sized, Indian-made “decorative” telescope.

20170716_073956

1917-vintage Broadhurst, Clarkson & Co Sig., Tel (MkIV) in its natural environment, being used as an aid for field panorama sketching. Seen here a couple of months back on a mid-winter swag walk in the mountains west of Sydney.

Here’s a tip if you’re ever looking at one of these old telescopes online or at a second hand store with a view to buying it – If the seller says it must be broken because it won’t focus, then you’re probably very close to getting yourself a bargain. Why is that? These multiple draw telescopes won’t focus if you just twist the eyepiece. In fact, if you do that with this particular model, the eyepiece will unscrew and fall off! Nope, to focus these you must push in or pull out the last draw tube until the image comes into focus.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, on to my telescope. The telescope is a World War One era British signalling  and general service telescope. It was used by signallers before radio communications became commonplace. Flashing electric light or signal mirror Morse code or perhaps semaphore flags were used to send messages over long distances and the message was received by an observer with a telescope.

B-46130-235

Trainee signallers at a South Australian army camp circa 1915. Two heliograph (signal mirror) units on tripods are the “transmitters”. A telescope on a tripod  is the “receiver”. Until well into the 1940s, this was the most common use of the military telescopes – on land at least.  SLSA B46130/235

Probably more famously, these were used by British and Commonwealth snipers in the First World War and while they were replaced in British service by a lighter model, this particular model of telescope soldiered on with Australian reconnaissance parties, intelligence officers and snipers during the Second World War too. In fact, I can’t lay my hand on the photo, but I’m pretty sure there’s a picture of an Aussie sniper spotter using one of these obsolete telescopes during the Korean War of the 1950s.

4266506

Simply captioned “Snipers 5th L.H., one firing and other pointing with telescope.”, I believe that this image shows famous Australian Light Horse sniper Billy Sing and one of his two main spotters, “Jack” Idriess on Gallipoli in 1915. The spotter here is seen using one of the telescopes in question which has been camouflaged with hessian strips. Idriess of course would later become well known as the author Ion L. Idriess. AWM P10522.024.003

The telescope is marked with the following –

“TEL. SIG. (Mk IV) also G.S.
BROADHURST, CLARKSON & Co
LONDON
1917
22084”

596386562077d_s-l1600(5).jpg.617f2906d2bd3d7fbf25af2747f95b53

The Low Power eyepiece is shown above its leather pouch. With a relatively narrow field of view, sometimes it’s easier to use the telescope with this lower power 20x eyepiece fitted.

As far as I can tell, it’s a variable 20x to 40x telescope with a brass body and has a leather covering on the barrel and the extending sun shade. It has two leather end caps, a shoulder strap and a small tubular leather pouch threaded onto the shoulder strap which holds the low or high power eyepiece – whichever isn’t fitted to the telescope at the time.

19667899_110748629553550_9046082594895121837_o.thumb.jpg.a1a679965463c17b0b28bcf865112220

The telescope extended. It’s over a metre long and in fantastic condition for a 100 year old piece of equipment.

I bought it online from overseas with very little info from the seller. The pictures supplied by the seller were promising, with the 100 year old leather components looking almost pristine. I figured that if the leatherwork was in such great condition, then the rest of the telescope would be too. Sure, there was a risk that the objective lens may have been infested with fungus or smashed, but it was worth the risk and I was not disappointed. It’s a truly beautiful instrument.

20170716_081014.jpg.1f94d5daee3a86d2759b680086026a7b

If you look closely you can see the markings.

The weight was a huge surprise to me. I’ve taken the telescope along on several overnight bushwalking and swagwalking trips and you definitely notice the extra weight of the telescope and tripod.

19944500_113924785902601_230282027873658119_o.jpg.372a46294e93630cd28cc30e056eb459

The telescope is carried by the shoulder strap. The tripod seen here is not original to this telescope, it’s actually a few decades older and was originally a deer stalker’s or target shooter’s tripod since it came with a rifle rest attachment as well. When strapped up in this fashion, the tripod can also be carried on the telescope’s shoulder strap.

I’ve been using it for field panorama sketching and it really helps with the details. You could use binoculars for this purpose, but I think that to get the same sort of powerful magnification as with this telescope, the binos would be huge and prohibitively heavy for this sort of work.

596386705e0a9_s-l1600(6).jpg.8ab6fe5dfff1fc7ae8dfa6ff4c89f965

When all closed up with both leather end caps fitted the telescope is very well protected and quite compact. Still very heavy though!

This is a powerful telescope – really powerful. Last full moon I set it up in the backyard to check out the moon. The image was spectacular. Clearly defined raters and debris trails from the meteor impacts. Due to full time auto focus on my phone’s camera I unfortunately I haven’t yet worked out how to take a photo through the telescope, but when I do I’ll take a whole lot and post them. It has to be seen to be believed.

Advertisements

Notebook Hacks – Accommodating the Bullet Pencil

The bullet pencil is the perfect size for a trouser pocket, but sometimes one feels compelled to attach it to one’s notebook to have it close to hand when needed.

I like notebooks and I particularly like the waxed cotton-covered Australian Defence Force field message notebooks with their gridded pages and old school carbon paper insert.  One day I glanced at a field message notebook and then I glanced at my bullet pencil, then just like the guy who invented the concept of dipping crispy bacon in maple syrup, I had an epiphany.

To carry out my evil plan I needed some supplies…

  • An ADF field message notebook
  • A bullet pencil
  • An old leather belt
  •  2 x pop rivets
  • 2 x small washers
  • Pop rivet gun
  • Leather punch
  • A 32 oz ball pein hammer
Some of the supplies needed to perform this delicate and complex notebook hacking procedure.

Some of the supplies needed to perform this delicate and complex notebook hacking procedure.

The Procedure

Step 1 – Measure a strip of leather belt to the right size. It should comfortably wrap around the bullet pencil and leave a 1/4 to 1/2 inch overlap. Using a pencil or pen mark where your rivets will go on the folded/wrapped piece of leather.

Step 2 – Punch the holes using, you guessed it, a hole punch. If you don’t have a hole punch, then use a sharp and pointy instrument such as a knife point.

Step 3 – Using the holes in the leather as a guide, mark the holes on the cover of your notebook. Place these wherever you think a pen or pencil would sit easily and unobtrusively. Punch, gouge or cut the holes in the cover.

Step 4 – Place the folded leather into position on the cover and place a pop rivet head through it. Now place a washer over the rivet head as it protrudes from the other side of the cover.

Step 5 – Rivet into place using the pop rivet gun. You’ll notice that the washer now becomes a flange to stop the rivet pulling out of the cover.

Step 6 – repeat steps 4 and 5 with the other rivet.

Step 7 – insert bullet pencil and we’re done.

Inside the cover. I've found this configuration to give the neatest result.

Inside the cover. I’ve found this configuration to give the neatest result.

Outside the cover - notice how the washers now lock the rivet into position.

Outside the cover – notice how the washers now lock the rivet into position. After this has been done you can flatten out the rivets by pounding them with a big hammer if you wish. I did and found it to be a liberating experience.

IMG_20131118_090135

IMG_20131118_090149

Works on any type of hard cover notebook. This one is fitted to an A5-sized sketch book.

Works on any type of hard cover notebook. This one is fitted to an A5-sized sketch book.

Field Sketching Outfit

Field Sketching was originally a military skill developed to a fine art in the 18th and 19th Centuries.

In a time of hit-and-miss topographic mapping, field panoramic sketches drawn/painted from a known point on the map were invaluable for allowing officers to visualise the terrain they would be working in. With the advent of portable photographic equipment and aerial photography in particular in the early 20th Century, it started to become obsolete as a military skill. By the end of the 2nd World War, the fine art of field sketching had all but died out, although it has continued to be used by snipers, intelligence personnel and special forces to a far lesser degree.

A stunning WWI panoramic field sketch in watercolour painted by a member of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in Palestine in 1917. Image courtesy NZ Government Archives.

A stunning WWI-era military panoramic field sketch in watercolour painted by a member of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in Palestine in 1917. Image courtesy NZ Government Archives.

Field sketches were drawn and sometimes were painted in order to illustrate subtle details and changes in vegetation and terrain. Destined to be used once and then discarded, it’s a miracle that any of these field sketches have survived the rigours of time and neglect. We’ll cover the actual art of field sketching in a later post.

To bring the lost art of field sketching back to life, it all starts with the equipment. In this case, a Field Sketching Outfit. Inspired by expeditionary artist Maria Coryell-Martin’s field-appropriate Art Toolkit (http://expeditionaryart.com/shop/product/art-tool-kit/) and knowing a little bit about the methodology of military field sketching from various 19th and early/mid 20th Century manuals on the subject, I have put together a period-style field sketching outfit.

Field Sketching Outfit with accoutrements.

Field Sketching Outfit with its accouterments – a compass and case, field glasses and mini-tripod. Mini-tripod is entirely optional.

The outfit is based on an Australian-made 1943 vintage No. 2 Mk.I General Service map case and it’s turned out to be the perfect size for this purpose.

The map case open, showing the general layout of the paper and equipment inside.

The map case open, showing the general layout of the paper and equipment inside.

Inside the map case cover are sewn loops and pockets which now contain the following:

  • Tin of watercolour paints
  • Vintage celluloid protractor with string
  • 6-inch metal ruler
  • 3 x assorted brushes
  • An HB pencil
  • A 2B pencil
Watercolour paints tin along with spare brush, short metal ruler and a protractor.

Watercolour paints tin along with spare brush, short metal ruler and a vintage protractor.

Clipped to the map board are the following:

  • A cello bag containing a small supply of general purpose paper towels
  • A field message notebook – contains gridded pages which are great for noting down fine detail before transferring to the paper
  • An A5 spiral-bound book of 30 pages of watercolour/sketch paper
To the mapboard are clipped a notebook, watercolour/sketch paper and a bag of paper towels.

To the mapboard are clipped a notebook, watercolour/sketch paper and a bag of paper towels.

An acetate map overlay sheet covers and protects the paper when the case is closed up. On the back of the map board has been fitted a jury-rigged tripod mount for use with a standard photographic tripod, or in this case, with an Ultrapod II compact tripod spraypainted green. This allows the case’s map board to be mounted as a plane table for sketching and watercolour painting. I find working with the outfit on my lap while I’m sitting to be the most comfortable method in the field, but a tripod mount gives some more options.

Back of outfit showing tripod mounting block.

Back of outfit showing tripod mounting block.

Other equipment used with the outfit includes:

  • Prismatic Compass with case and lanyard
  • Map
  • Field Glasses
  • Mini Tripod (optional, but useful for OP work)
  • Shoulder strap

Next post in this series will cover the methodology behind an accurate field sketch.