Another pair of binoculars… SARD Mark 21 7x50s.

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WWII SARD Mark 21 7×50 binos, complete with rubber eyecups and leather binocular strap.

These binos aren’t particularly collectible, nor are they very expensive, but they are a nice pair of WWII 7×50 US Navy BuAer Mark 21 binoculars.

I liked them because they have flip out amber filters and shaped rubber eyecups. Despite my own advice to never buy binos off ebay again, I bought them off ebay. The seller is same fellow from whom I bought my 1960s/70s Binos Prismatic No2Mk3 6×30 binoculars a week or so ago. I was very impressed with those binoculars and I was not disappointed with these ones.

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A Trio of Binoculars.

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The binos in question. L to R: 1943 British Bino., Prism., No. 2 Mk. III, 1960s/70s British Bino., Prism., No2Mk3, New manufacture Chinese brass M_AUSE_R 8×24 binos.

Vintage binos are cool, and if they work as they are designed to, then they are even cooler.

In this post, we’ll be looking at a trio of prismatic binoculars –

  • one entirely serviceable pair of 1960s or 70s 6×30 British Binoculars, Prismatic, No2Mk3 made by Kershaw;
  • one pair of 1943-manufactured British Binoculars, Prismatic No. 2 Mk. III which require restoration work made by Taylor & Hobson;
  • one pair of new-manufacture, Chinese made M_AUSE_R 8×24 prismatic, brass-bodied binoculars.

We’ll also look at the WWII British binocular strap and two WWII binocular cases, the British Pattern 1937 and the Australian Jungle No. 1.

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Camp lighting, classic camping style – the folding candle lantern – Part 1

Aside from the comforting red-orange flickering glow from a campfire, some sort of camp lighting is a must-have.

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My modern canvas bell tent lit by the soft glow of a folding candle lantern during a canoe trip a couple of years back.

Nowadays the options for camp lighting are many and varied – from the UCO Micro candle lantern through to the awesomely-effective inflatable, solar powered LED lanterns or the much-maligned compact but super-bright LED headlamp – why much maligned? Invariably if you’re out camping with a group and people are using these headlights, you’ll be blinded every time someone looks at you. At times I have taken to wearing sunglasses at night around the campfire when camping with larger groups and I personally won’t use a head lamp out of a pure disdain for them.

If you like the old-timey vibe, you can go for a pressure lantern such as the Coleman Powerhouse dual fuel lantern. If you’re boring, then use a gas/propane lantern. If you’re going to do that you might even go for some 12v LED strip lighting or fluoros…

For “classic” camping such as I practice, the options for camp lighting are somewhat limited, but they are definitely cool.  One of my camp lighting favourites is the candle lantern.

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