Camp lighting, classic camping style – the folding candle lantern – Part 1

Aside from the comforting red-orange flickering glow from a campfire, some sort of camp lighting is a must-have.

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My modern canvas bell tent lit by the soft glow of a folding candle lantern during a canoe trip a couple of years back.

Nowadays the options for camp lighting are many and varied – from the UCO Micro candle lantern through to the awesomely-effective inflatable, solar powered LED lanterns or the much-maligned compact but super-bright LED headlamp – why much maligned? Invariably if you’re out camping with a group and people are using these headlights, you’ll be blinded every time someone looks at you. At times I have taken to wearing sunglasses at night around the campfire when camping with larger groups and I personally won’t use a head lamp out of a pure disdain for them.

If you like the old-timey vibe, you can go for a pressure lantern such as the Coleman Powerhouse dual fuel lantern. If you’re boring, then use a gas/propane lantern. If you’re going to do that you might even go for some 12v LED strip lighting or fluoros…

For “classic” camping such as I practice, the options for camp lighting are somewhat limited, but they are definitely cool.  One of my camp lighting favourites is the candle lantern.

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Make Your Own Archival Gear – Pocket Strike-a-Light Outfit

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Back in the olden days, when matches were scarce in the outlying areas, many bushmen went back to their ancestral roots and used flint and steel instead. I’m not talking about the spark-showering ferrocerium rods sold today as “firesteels”, ferrocerium wasn’t even invented until the early 20th Century. No, what I’m talking about is a lump of steel (high carbon is best) struck against a lump of rock (flint or quartz, etc.) with the resulting spark caught by some form of tinder (charred cloth or dried fungus) and then coaxed into a flame with the addition of some bullswool (such as a bundle of dry grass or shredded stringybark). That’s a crash course in the use of the traditional flint and steel. The good news is that the use of a traditional flint and steel becomes much easier with practice. Continue reading

Archival Gear – Schmacalder Prismatic Compass by Ross Ltd. circa 1897-1907

Well, I’m back.

My dalliance with that other site wasn’t as successful as I’d have liked, so I’m transferring the more interesting of my posts over here to where they are more suited.

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The pocket-sized Schmalcalder prismatic compass ready to use, with lid removed, front sight vane in position and prism flipped up.

The first is a good look at an unusual compass from the late 19th Century. One of the first prismatic marching compasses, it’s the sort of thing Baden-Powell or Burnham may have carried during the Matabele Campaign.

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